Indigenous fire practice and biodiversity protection

181010105553_1_540x360Traditional indigenous burning practices are protecting plant biodiversity in Australia’s Gibson Desert, according to University of Queensland research. The study analysed how environments dominated by flammable spinifex grasses and fire-sensitive desert myrtle shrubs reacted to wildfires, and to the low-intensity burning practices of the Pintupi people.

UQ School of Agriculture and Food Sciences researcher Dr Boyd Wright was originally doing field work for a book about edible and medicinal plants used by Indigenous people of Kiwirrkurra, on the eastern edge of the Gibson Desert. “While on these field trips I realised that the spinifex and desert myrtle environments resembled what we in the ecology community call alternative stable state systems,” Dr Wright said.

Read the full article in Science Daily

Advertisements